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Archive for September, 2009

Windows 7 Party Pack Unboxed!

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Scratch what I said before, today I just received Windows 7 Ultimate Edition (for FREE!).

This post could be interpreted as an ode to the fantastic customer service you can receive from Microsoft. Actually scratch that, this post IS an ode to the fantastic customer service you can receive from Microsoft.

You can stop rubbing your eyes, it’s true.

About two weeks ago I happened upon a news item stating Microsoft were to celebrate the launch of Windows 7 worldwide by offering potential customers the opportunity to host their own Windows 7 launch parties. For your troubles (and assuming you were successful in being selected to host a launch party) you would receive a whole host of goodies in your ‘party pack’.

The official line was a mixed bag but was satisfactory although ultimately disappointing. I was not expecting to be graciously offered a USA Party Pack for gratis though!

Thinking this to be a great idea, and a great chance to grab a copy of Windows 7, I hastily made my way to the application website eager to submit my details in the hopes of making the cut to host a party. Unfortunately, living on an island the size of a pea doesn’t fall under the radar of countries eligible to participate in the promotion.

I was livid, every other region of the world was being represented here except for the Caribbean. Finding this to be a touch xenophobic I made a concerted effort to contact various folk at Microsoft (thanks The Consumerist!) to express my opinion and frustration. What happened next I could never have expected.

I received a reply via email the very next day.

A very courteous email arrived explaining reasons why the Caribbean region was not covered in the promotion. The official line was a mixed bag but was satisfactory although ultimately disappointing. I was not expecting to be graciously offered a USA Party Pack for gratis though! I submitted my delivery details as requested and sure enough today I received a giant box from Microsoft the contents of which you can see in my unboxing pictures below.

The goodies are actually very nice, especially the Windows 7 tote bags, perfect for the Cayman Islands for the beach! Also included were Windows 7 branded napkins, a puzzle pack; the pieces come together to form a wallpaper image from Windows 7. There was also a pack of Windows 7 playing cards, a colour poster and of course the piece de resistance, a FULL copy of Windows 7 Ultimate Edition (Steve Ballmer Signature Edition). What I was not expecting though was the Anytime Upgrade to Ultimate Signature 64 bit edition. A nice bonus!

I feel very fortunate to have been offered the free party pack, but I hope also that the words I sent to Microsoft may make them reconsider their promotional strategy next time round. People do live in the Caribbean too you know!

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Written by The Editor

September 29th, 2009 at 7:35 pm

Kill The Naked: Progress Report 1

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Kill The Naked

It has been quite some time since I have been able to post any updates regarding my ‘Kill The Naked’ album project, but I do have some further information and some audio clips from a work in progress to share with you!

To be honest my schedule has become so busy in recent weeks that it has been virtually impossible to find not only the time but the drive to carry on with the project. That is not to say I haven’t done any work on tracks for the album (which I am fast reconsidering streamlining down to an EP, for now, due to schedule constraints).

I’ve laid down quite a few bits that just haven’t developed in to something further. I think production kind of got a bit muddled and I wasn’t sure what direction I wanted to take tracks in. However a track I began work on as a techno track has actually evolved in to a drum and bass track. The decision to change genre was based purely on the sample used for the track.

This work in progress samples an 80’s classic (yes I know it’s the ‘in’ decade right now but that was not the reason for inclusion here). I initially used the sample within a 4/4 balls-out techno track but found it sounded a bit too generic and offered nothing new. It was only recently after scrapping the techno track and completely reworking the sample that I found it would fit in to a drum and bass style perfectly. Hence the decision to take the track forward as drum and bass.

The track has no title but you can listen to two separate clips at the end of this post. I’d love to get some critique to see what you think. The bass line and various effects and levels have yet to be added so what your hearing is essentially vanilla.

Lastly I think I am enjoying drum and bass production more than house/techno production. I think it offers me more room for creativity and experimentation with some bizarre ideas. The techno stuff just became formulaic and I wasn’t enjoying it so I think the final EP (or album) product may well not feature this genre but concentrate more on experimental breakbeat tracks. Of course with the way production is going right now I’ll probably have changed my mind again by the next update.

For now though, enjoy the audio clips and please do drop in a comment or two. All critique welcome!

Audio clip one:

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Audio clip two:

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Written by The Editor

September 27th, 2009 at 7:04 pm

Sunday Seafoam fun! If I can do it, so can you!

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Seafoam

Having taken a couple of weeks to get used to the knacks and quirks of buying a used car, I used the time between purchase and today to do lots of research on our new vehicle.

Since purchase I have actually undertaken a couple of small jobs already. A couple still remain which I will get around to sooner rather than later. I began by replacing the air filter, a simple enough job considering I have never actually attempted to do this before. Next up was stripping out the useless (and broken) radio the previous owner had left in it. This actually led me to uncover a whole host of issues regarding the stereo.

Wires were cut off in the wrong place, patched to the wrong wires causing one speaker (the rear left one) to blow at some point before I took ownership and mute all but one speaker. Whoever wired this stereo and speakers up had absolutely no idea what they were doing I’ll tell you that much.

I chose to buy and install a Kenwood KDC-MP142 head unit complete with remote control and front aux (perfect for plugging my iPod in to). I was tired post-working day and wanted the install out of the way quickly. Removing the radio panel and old head unit was simple enough. Even installing the head unit and the rest of the plugs was easy enough.

That is until I got to the last cable, the power ISO harness.

Behind that front panel was a complete dog’s breakfast of wires. To cap it off the harness that was wired up to the old head unit was so badly done (and the wrong size for my new Kenwood) that I didn’t want to risk it and thus had to wait until yesterday to get the entire car audio setup rewired by a professional. I’d like to take this opportunity to highly recommend Mr. Henry at Funky Tang’s in George Town, Grand Cayman. He was very quick, very professional and done an excellent job on the audio wiring.

During installation he actually discovered a whole host of problems with the wiring that I would have otherwise not discovered. Wires were cut off in the wrong place, patched to the wrong wires causing one speaker (the rear left one) to blow at some point before I took ownership and mute all but one speaker. Whoever wired this stereo and speakers up had absolutely no idea what they were doing I’ll tell you that much.

Delighted with the ability to listen to music on the daily commute, next up was something I have read so much about on the Internet. Seafoam.

Seafoam is the jewel in the DIY car maintenance crown it would seem. Every page I loaded online during my research on Seafoam raved and celebrated its brilliance. But what does it do and why use it?

Seafoam is a petroleum-based product that you add to your vehicle in order to clean dirt and sticky residue directly from your engine. The most recommended way to utilize Seafoam is by dividing the can in to thirds. One third you add directly to the engine oil. The second third you add directly to the gas tank. The final third you add either via the PCV valve or via the brake booster vacuum. I chose the latter which was a little daunting as on my first attempt the engine cut out and for a moment I thought I had wrecked my shiny new gas guzzler.

Thankfully this was not the case. Upon adding the entire can of Seafoam to the vehicle all that was left was to wait around 20 minutes or so while the Seafoam worked its magic and hope and pray the vehicle would start when I went back outside to inspect the results!

With 20 minutes gone I ventured outside with the good woman who helped me video what we hoped would be the infamous Seafoam spectacle of Chernobyl-grade plumes of white smoke emanating from the exhaust pipe of our All-American economy destroyer. Alas we did not receive the spectacle we were so hoping for, but that is actually a positive result. The less smoke you get from a Seafoam treatment, the cleaner your engine is deemed to be. Sure, we got the odd plume here and there, but thankfully we were not overcome with masses of fumes. A result really, it means our thirteen year old vehicle is in tip top shape (at least from a cleanliness point of view, let us not jinx anything here!).

I took the Explorer out for a quick, vigorous drive to help clear the remainder of the Seafoam out of the vehicle and I’ll be honest with you, this stuff really is as good as users across the Internet say it is. The effects really are immediate. I noticed the car idled differently, smoother even. The other big thing I noticed was the throttle response was far more immediate than before the treatment. A real bonus because I thought with the lack of masses of smoke I would not notice much of a difference in performance. I like to be proven wrong!

Have a look at the video on the Stuff I Wrote YouTube channel (below) which shows you first hand the results of my experimentation with Seafoam. The stuff really does work and I thoroughly recommend it!

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Written by The Editor

September 20th, 2009 at 5:53 pm

After the hype: District 9 reviewed

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District 9 review

I can recall with great fondness the last movie that generally made my jaw drop and my eyes tingle with delight. In Bruges was that movie. That movie I can honestly say hand on heart is the last movie that, as the final credits rolled, left me with a genuine feeling of satisfaction. One that overwhelmed me, made me think about what I had seen, take a few moments to let it all sink in and walk away knowing I had just watched something great. Something that would not feature on my all-time top movies list, but certainly rank highly in the list of movies I love.

District 9 has now stolen that crown, and the coronation cape, and the sceptre and anything else it has coming to it.

I’ll cut to the chase and just come out with it right now, District 9 is one of the best movies I have ever seen and features on my (in no particular order may I add) list of favourite movies of all time.

Yes it is that good. Yes you should see it. NOW. MANY TIMES.

I’m actually finding it difficult to choose where I want to begin with my thoughts regarding District 9. It’s one of those movies that you start out feeling a little bemused by the premise. Yes it is far fetched, very far fetched in fact, but you will find out fast (if you have an open mind) that you get over your ‘bemusement’ and start to let the lunacy of the story capture your imagination very quickly. By the time the movie reaches the last third of its run time you’ll be hooked. I was literally on the edge of my seat, absolutely engrossed by what was unfolding before my eyes. I feel quietly confident that if you meet the aforementioned criteria you will be on the edge of your seat too.

I’m sure many of us put on a temper tantrum as young children in a supermarket and were swiftly grabbed by the arm by our parents who told us sternly to behave. District 9 more or less replicates that feeling, except it’s saying “listen you; I’m not finished with you yet! Here, have some of this…!”

District 9 is a sci-fi movie directed by Neill Blomkamp, a young South African writer/director who, rumour has it, was ‘discovered’ by one Peter Jackson thanks to the short film Jackson saw, directed by Blomkamp, called Alive In Joburg (of which District 9 is a remake of sorts of). Shot in a half-docu/half Michael Bay-esque balls out action flick style, District 9 unabashedly questions what life is like today when aliens landed on Earth (in South Africa no less) and, once deemed to have ‘come in peace’, take up residence among humans. The new residents appear to have some anger management issues and thus are held in shanty towns within a sealed off area of Johannesburg called ‘District 9′. Unfortunately both human and alien races are having trouble living side by side, forcing corruption, violence and mass protests against the new residents of Johannesburg.

District 9 teaser poster

Enter Wikus Van De Merwe, a Government employee who has been assigned the task of handing out eviction notices to the residents of District 9 in order for it to be destroyed (and hopefully send the aliens back home). What begins as a routine fly-on-the-wall documentary following Wikus and his task to evict the residents of District 9 makes the most sudden and dramatic of U-turns in to a fight to save not only his own life, but those of the residents of District 9.

Thankfully I distanced myself as far away from this movie as possible during the pre-release build-up and for a few weeks post-release to allow any hype to die off. I went in to it with zero expectations and I’ll admit at first I was a little puzzled about just what it was I was sitting down to watch. I will even boldly go so far as to say I was seconds away from walking away from it. On reflection I am so glad I stuck with it. You may find yourself agreeing with me when/if you watch District 9 that the actual blend of docu-style handheld reportage mixed with the flamboyant lunacy of the plot can be a bit much to take. Perhaps this technique was used to capture the audience immediately; I personally felt it was trying to take itself a little too seriously. That’s what nearly made me switch off. With such a fantastic concept and plot for a Sci-Fi movie, I just wanted it to let go of that seriousness, loosen that strict grip and just let go and have fun.

Mercifully it did.

In EPIC proportions.

You may or may not choose to read on here as what could be construed as subtle spoilers will be found within the following text. If you are still reading, thanks, I hope you enjoyed the movie too!

District 9 quickly evolves in to complete and utter madness. It’s only when you look back at what you just witnessed over the last hundred and a bit minutes that you begin to question if Jackson being on board had an influence on the plot, the direction or indeed the director. There are so many neat little touches to be found within the run time of this Sci-Fi epic. For starters for a film that was shot on a budget of three quarters of a shoestring, the CGI, if a little ropey at times, is absolutely staggeringly great. Favourite CGI touches for me centered around the alien weaponry. Lots of quality blasts and face-shattering explosions abound!

I also enjoyed (what I assume to be) the little nods to obscure genres that made up the theme of the film. The whole concept of ‘New Flesh’ that was such a big theme within the works of pioneers of that genre, most notably Shinya Tsukamoto and his genius Tetsuo movies. Coming back to the Jackson-inspire stuff, I felt at times I found influence and inspiration in the movie from early Jackson works Bad Taste and Braindead. Albeit not quite as crudely done as those early works were, but still handed out to the audience with equal amounts of lunacy and brashness.

But by far, the moment of the movie which, on a personal level, touched me very deeply and made me thank the lord that the film industry was slowly but surely starting to recognize and deliver great works again was the moment the exoskeleton opened up to allow Wikus to climb inside it. Yes it was predictable he was going to get in it, but the way in which that scene was delivered, the way the shot cuts between the exoskeleton and Wikus, that look in his eye making the decision to climb in absolutely won me over. Intentional or not I don’t know, nor do I care. I saw it as a nod to anime/manga greats such as Patlabor and Appleseed. That, as an avid anime fan and a gorger of as much manga as my eyes can cope with, was a moment where I actually screamed “YES!” at the screen and pumped my fist in the air in delight!

As if everything leading up to that scene wasn’t absolute perfection already, the film just unleashes complete and utter chaos of absolutely EPIC proportions. The action simply does not stop. I’m sure many of us put on a temper tantrum as young children in a supermarket and were swiftly grabbed by the arm by our parents who told us sternly to behave. District 9 more or less replicates that feeling, except it’s saying “listen you; I’m not finished with you yet! Here, have some of this…!” BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! KAZZAMMO! BOOM! ZZAP! and so on and so forth until finally the screen fades and the credits begin to roll, the lights come up and you’re left absolutely exhausted but entirely happy and completely satisfied that what you just saw was something the film industry desperately needs more of.

Alas we all know what that is and alas it’s not going to happen. This is what makes District 9 so special. It’s these one-off classics that will still be on your shelf in years to come while the dross that’s churned out of the studio doors week in week out will quickly fall by the wayside and out of the memories of many.

District 9 is a love it or hate it movie. Sure enough it has me and my friends divided. Each of them either loves it or hates it. Thankfully more people I have consulted tend to be in agreement that it is an amazing movie. Hopefully the studio behind this gem won’t push for a sequel (hints of one are thrown in to the movie with gusto). Unfortunately in modern times, when a movie becomes a box office smash a sequel is more or less green lit before the movie has even finished it’s theatre run.

Whether you end up loving it or hating it is beside the point here. As previously mentioned, movies like this come along once in a blue moon. Whatever your personal opinion of it might be, it, along with recent movies such as The Dark Knight and There Will Be Blood for example, District 9 ranks as one of those movies you simply cannot afford to miss for fear of having nothing to talk about when your friends have all seen it and are discussing it.

As for me, I don’t care what anyone else thinks, nor what the hype machine may generate. For me, District 9 is a movie I have absolutely, completely and utterly fallen head over heels in love with. I am proud to nestle it in with the other movies on my all-time favourites list.

District 9 is 99.9% sheer movie perfection.

10/10

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Written by The Editor

September 19th, 2009 at 9:30 pm

BP’s ‘giant’ find in Mexico eases my new purchase guilt

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Fuel Guage

Several weeks ago I made an important ‘family’ decision. I decided it was time to start looking for a 2nd car (I’ll spare you the boring details, we just needed a second vehicle). Living in the Caribbean, a region of the world susceptible to extreme weather conditions; a place where a hurricane or sporadic heavy rainfall can leave you wading through several feet of water in mear minutes, you will find a large volume of citizens choose to drive SUVs. A sensible off-road choice, (currently) not a sensible financial one.

Today I bought a 1996 4.0l V6 Ford Explorer XLT.

This used beauty spans the width of three continents, weighs in at a scale-busting 87,000 tonnes delivering a (non)face-shattering 210bhp resulting in a majestic 12 (yes TWELVE) whole entire city miles to the glorious gallon.

That should keep Greenpeace happy.

Don’t get me wrong I’m all for fuel economy, lowering greenhouse gases and reducing my carbon footprint. I love a great deal on fuel prices too. When I lived in the UK I would have email alerts sent to me daily from petrolprices.com and would drive to the next service station because they offered unleaded for a penny less than the other gas stations in my area at that particular time. So why am I buying a hulking great gas guzzler then?

Sure the CRV is less thirsty when it comes to fuel consumption and yes you can run the thing in to the ground and it will refuse to die. But with a bit of TLC and a foot not made of lead the Explorer can more or less compete too.

Island Life

Living on a small Caribbean island dramatically streamlines your automotive purchase, rather it makes it much easier. Mainly due to used car prices and lack of choice. Here in the Cayman Islands the used car market is forever buoyant. Cars and trucks hold their value due to the difficulty and expense of importing new ones. Earlier this week I saw an ad on a Cayman classifieds website for a 1988 BMW 3 Series. This dream ride can be yours for just CI$1000 (about US$1200). That said, I fail to see how the market and it’s consistent buoyancy is not supported by at least a little owner induced artificial inflation. Still, it keeps the market healthy and buying a used or indeed new car here can be looked upon as an investment of sorts.

The Ford Explorer is a popular car round these parts, probably more popular than it was/is in the United States. The island is literally flooded with them so buying a used one makes finding one easy and negotiating the sale even easier. The price difference between the Explorer and it’s nearest island competitor, the Honda CRV, is the tipping point. The deal clincher if you will. In Grand Cayman you can land yourself a reasonably tidy, mid-to-high mileage Ford Explorer circa 1995-1998 for between CI$2000-CI$4000. A CRV with the same specs will set you back anywhere between CI$3500-CI$7000.

It’s a Honda. It won’t die

Sure the CRV is less thirsty when it comes to fuel consumption and yes you can run the thing in to the ground and it will refuse to die. But with a bit of TLC and a foot not made of lead the Explorer can more or less compete too. From an ex-pat point of view that means I can get myself a Ford Explorer (a car made in the USA meaning parts are more readily available and cheaper than for Japanese vehicles) for a lot less than a Honda CRV. I can maintain and repair it for less and with a lighter foot I can get (still horrendous) reasonable fuel economy from it.

Plus as the owner of the world’s most excitable dog (also the world’s most car sickness prone), I am blessed with a trunk space the size of St Paul’s Cathedral and additional air vents in the rear to not only keep passengers cool but also prevent my pooch from overheating when it’s 90F+ outside (basically every day of the year here in the Tropics).

Going it alone

Taking your vehicle to a professional is not cheap anywhere, not just Grand Cayman. That is why I have decided to go it alone for the simple stuff with the Explorer purchase. Not only because it is an older vehicle and I don’t want to put too much money in to it (besides the stereo which is coming out of it’s current home asap to be replaced with something that will provide at the very least an auxiliary hook-up to my iPod, and hopefully soon a Zune HD) but also because I want to use it as an opportunity to learn something, at the very least the basics of car maintenance and servicing.

As soon as I can get my hands on one I am getting myself a Haynes manual. I already have one minor repair job to undertake; replacing the hood struts. Easy enough job it would appear from what I have read but I would still like the trusty Haynes book to help me out.

Incidentally it was while browsing the Haynes website that I actually came across a very useful page containing a variety of free videos and podcasts that demonstrate simple routine maintenance techniques. I think any complete novice would find a video detailing a basic oil change procedure to be very useful. Take a look, there are lots more free videos available. Save yourself some money!

An acceptable SUV (sort-of)

I find myself writing this article almost as a defense of my SUV purchase. Maybe it’s hidden guilt. I never thought I would find myself driving a big All-American SUV. I’ve never wanted one. Nor did I think I would use the ‘excuse’ that my dog fulfills the need for extortionate boot space.

When you find yourself jotting down a list of reasons why you would want to buy such a vehicle in an age where vehicles today are vastly different than they were 13 years ago, not only in design but for economical reason for ownership, you can find no justifiable reason for owning a vehicle such as this.

Unless you live somewhere as unique as the Cayman Islands.

And it is for the exact reasons outlined in this article that the knot in my stomach as I drove my new SUV home has disappeared and the overwhelming sense of guilt at owning a ‘gas guzzler’ has more or less fallen by the wayside.

If you find yourself at a gas station on Thursday and you are wondering why the cost of fuel just sky-rocketed, please accept my most sincere apologies. It’s my Ford Explorer’s fault, not mine.

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Written by The Editor

September 9th, 2009 at 7:00 am

Cloud computing. It’s awesome but it’s not awesome really.

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Cloud Computing

Cloud computing. It, along with virtualization are the two hottest things in the IT industry today. It’s also had a bit of a rough day today.

Virtualization speaks for itself (assuming you, the dear person reading this are IT savvy). If it doesn’t, to put it in basic terms, virtualization gives users the ability to consolidate several computers in to one ‘host’ computer. As an example let’s say I build one physical computer. I can then install virtualization software on that computer and effectively install multiple computer operating systems on to one computer. It therefore eliminates the cost of hardware and thus puts a nice big smile on the face of whoever handles the IT budget at your place of work.

Thus the few (!) folk out there that truly rely on Google’s lovely applications to get through their busy work days (and believe me, there are lots of these users; mostly working for companies with an IT budget of zero that see Google Applications as a cost-cutting superhero and who can blame them?) were left with nothing for the best part of 2 to 3 hours today.

The other hot topic in IT today is ‘cloud’ computing. It too uses consolidation (and also synchronization) to form its heartbeat. The difference being that the ‘cloud’ part means data is stored online (the cloud). This also means that all devices connected to the cloud (with relevant permissions of course) can access the data and any changes made to the data will be synchronized across all devices with access to the cloud.

A comedic view on cloud computing

A comedic view on cloud computing

There are currently two major mainstream examples of cloud computing available today, lots of other companies are joining the wagon at almost breakneck pace but we’ll concentrate on these two for this article. You may well have heard of them (sense the irony approaching); Google Applications and Microsoft Mesh. Granted Mesh is still in its beta infancy and will probably lose its ‘free’ status once it hits the market proper.

Google Applications (which forms the concentration of this blog entry) consist of a variety of tools, the most well known would comprise of Mail (or Gmail), Reader, Calendar and Docs. For the unfamiliar Gmail is your standard webmail (think hotmail, yahoo mail etc) client. Reader is (as you’ve probably gathered from my previous post) a fantastic RSS/Atom feed management tool. Calendar is the same as your calendar feature in Microsoft Outlook. Finally Docs is a fully fledged document viewing application, suitable for all those PDF and Word files you know and love. The ‘cloud’ formed here comes from the fact that all of these applications are offered to the end user by Google and hosted by Google (e.g. provided to you by Google for use online). The cloud is amassed further by these applications being accessible by the end user with any device they choose to use (including special Google applications for BlackBerry, iPhone and other mobile devices). For the cherry on the cake, all of these applications, from wherever you choose to access them, will remain in perfect synchronization with each other regardless of what you do with them. That’s your mainstream cloud computing right there.

It’s brilliant, it really is. Except it’s not really.

You see today, Google had a bit of a rough time keeping its Gmail application online. Thus the few (!) folk out there that truly rely on Google’s lovely applications to get through their busy work days (and believe me, there are lots of these users; mostly working for companies with an IT budget of zero that see Google Applications as a cost-cutting superhero and who can blame them?) were left with nothing for the best part of 2 to 3 hours today.

Zip, zilch, nada.

Right there is your problem. A percentage of users are so reliant on the ‘Google cloud’ that when it messed up today they were left with no fail-over to carry on with their work while Gmail was out of action. The same situation would apply within your workplace if (how IT industry brush-wielders see it anyway) cloud computing becomes the true staple of enterprise solutions.

It won’t. I guarantee it. At least not in the near future anyway.

Cloud computing at present is too risky. Especially for those who effectively have given ownership of their data to Google by using their ‘cloud apps’. If the cloud dies, and you become 110% reliant on it, you’re done for. Everything stops (as I am sure it did for many Google Applications users today). It certainly did for me. I guess it was fate telling me not to rely on the cloud as I was waiting for a really important email to arrive when the outage kicked in. Before this clash of fates amalgamated today I (on reflection) feel I put too much faith in the reliability of the Google cloud. Gmail (according to the Google dashboard status updates) was still accessible via POP and IMAP setups. For me, with POP and IMAP access not set up I had no other way to access my Gmail at such a crucial time.

How very appropriate.

How very appropriate.

I was infuriated. How could this be happening? A company as large as Google suffering downtime with their most popular application was for me a personal travesty. It was only when Gmail was brought back online that the aftershocks hit home and changed my outlook on cloud computing.

This evening, as I write this during the outage aftermath, I now feel entirely different about cloud computing. I wonder how many other users had developed a reliance on the cloud and what the future of this current hot topic may well be. I don’t think we will ever reach a point, at least in the Enterprise market, where information is stored and exchanged entirely within the cloud. That would just be stupid. On top of that I cannot see this happening from a security point of view. Leaving sensitive or classified data online presents a whole host of security issues that are significantly reduced with secure remote connectivity that is perfectly capable for the task and in widespread use today.

Cloud computing certainly has its audience but I can safely say with great confidence that I think it is more for the mass mainstream market and certainly not something that will be widely adopted by Enterprise.

I’ll leave it at that for now and let the good people at Google continue licking their wounds tonight.

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Written by The Editor

September 1st, 2009 at 8:12 pm